Category Archives: LINUX

DebEX Barebone Build 170822 with LXDE: Create you own Debian 9 “Stretch” system in the easiest possible way!

About DebEX Barebone, DebEX Gnome and DebEX KDE Linux 64 bit
All three systems/distributions are a based on Debian. DebEX KDE is based on Debian Jessie (Debian 8). DebEX Barebone and DebEX Gnome are based on Debian 9 (Stretch) and Debian unstable (Sid). LXDE is used as Desktop environment in DebEX Barebone. Gnome 3.22 and Mate 1.16 are used in DebEX Gnome. KDE 4.14.2 and KDE Plasma Desktop 5:84 are used in DebEX KDE. DebEX Barebone LXDE uses my special kernel 4.12.0-12-exton. (Kernel 4.12.8 – latest stable kernel). DebEX Gnome uses my special kernel 4.8.0-21-exton. (Kernel 4.8). DebEX KDE uses my special kernel 4.8.0-18-exton. (Kernel 4.8-rc8). The system language is English (in all three versions of DebEX).

NEWS 170822 about DebEX LXDE – a Refracta Build
A new version of DebEX Barebone with LXDE and kernel 4.12.0-12-exton (equivalent to Kernel.org’s latest stable kernel 4.12.8) is ready. All packages have been updated to the latest version as of August 22, 2017. DebEX Barebone is now based on Debian 9 Stretch and Debian unstable – Sid. I have replaced Google Chrome with Firefox 55.0.2 (for Netflix).

What’s new in kernel 4.12?

Important about Refracta
You can use the Refracta tools (pre-installed in DebEX LXDE) to create your own installable Debian Stretch Live DVD once you have installed DebEX LXDE to hard drive. I mean change everything and then create a whole new Debian Stretch live system. When you start Refracta it will look like this. You don’t even have to install DebEX to hard drive before you can use the Refracta tools. If you have plenty of RAM you can create a new (your own!) Debian 9 system while running DebEX from DVD or a USB stick. Please note that the whole Refracta process (creating your new ISO) will only take 5 – 10 min!  You’ll find the ISO in /home/snapshots.

SCREENSHOTS
1. The Boot menu in DebEX LXDE created with the Refracta tools
2. The LXDE Desktop in DebEX Barebone LXDE
3.  Netflix is running in Firefox
4. DebEX is running in VirtualBox
5. DebEX is running in VMware

READ MORE…

Run your Ubuntu/Debian 64 bit system with the latest stable kernel – 4.12.8!

linuxI have compiled yet another Ubuntu/Debian kernel for 64 bit systems. This time kernel 4.12.0-12-exton, equivalent to Kernel.org’s latest stable kernel 4.12.8 released 170816.

What’s new in Linux kernel 4.12?

Install kernel 4.12.0-12-exton in Ubuntu/Debian based distributions
My self-compiled Ubuntu kernels can be used in all types of modern Ubuntu systems, including Mint. They can even be used in Debian Jessie (Debian 8) and Debian Stretch (Debian 9). If you want to use my kernel 4.12.0-12-exton for 64 bit systems, you can DOWNLOAD it from here.

md5sum for ubuntu-kernel-64bit-4.12.0-12-exton.zip which is of 62,6 MB.

Installation instructions
Open the zip-file with WinZip, WinRAR or 7-Zip. Or run this command: unzip ubuntu-kernel-64bit-4.12.0-12-exton.zip. Go into the folder ubuntu-kernel-64bit-4.12.0-12-exton and run this command:
sudo dpkg -i *.deb

NOTE: Look into the folder ubuntu-kernel-64bit-4.12.0-12-exton first. Maybe you don’t want to install linux-tools and linux-cloud-tools. Then just delete six (6) deb-files before you run the above command.

Then: Run command sudo update-grub (if you use Grub2).

Nvidia
It is possible to install Nvidia’s proprietary drivers if you use “my” kernel 4.12.0-12-exton. Could be useful if you like to play games. The Nvidia drivers in for example Ubuntu’s repositories – “Current” etc. – can’t be used. It is supposed to be “impossible” to install Nvidia’s latest drivers when running kernel 4.10 – 4.12 without “patches” etc. On the other hand it’s a fact that kernel 4.12 has better support for the open-source Nvidia driver Nouveau than any other older kernel.

A small clarification
“My” kernel 4.12.0-12-exton is compiled (almost) the same way as all official Ubuntu kernels. That is, The Ubuntu Way. If not, the kernel would not function in a Ubuntu/Debian system.

Good luck!

How to watch Netflix in RaspEX Build 170810 based on Ubuntu 17.04

After my latest build of RaspEX (from 170810) was ready and released I stumbled over an article about How to watch Netflix on the Raspberry PiIf you use Raspbian or Raspberry Pi systems based on Raspbian you can just follow the instructions in said article to be able to watch Netflix. If you use (or want to use) RaspEX Build 170810 you’ll have to install two extra packages before you can install a special version of the Chromium Browser.

GO ON AND READ my instruction for RaspEX…

RaspEX for Raspberry Pi 3/2 – Build 170810 – based on Ubuntu 17.04 with LXDE and kernel 4.9.41-exton-v7+

NEWS 170810 about RaspEX for Raspberry Pi 3 and Pi 2
I have upgraded the whole system and replaced the old kernel 4.4.49 with “my own” compiled kernel 4.9.41-exton-v7+. RaspEX Build 170810 is a Linux ARM system for Raspberry Pi 3 and Pi 2. It is based on Debian 9, Ubuntu 17.04 and Linaro (Open Source software for ARM SoCs). In this new version (170810) I’ve installed Wicd Network Manager and replaced Chromium with Firefox with better support for YouTube. I have also installed Samba and VNC4Server so you can connect to your Windows computers in your Home Network and/or control RaspEX on your Raspberry Pi 3 or Pi 2 from your Windows computers with VNC Viewer and/or PuTTY (Telnet and SSH client). Furthermore some extra Network Tools, Midori Private Browser, SMTube (YouTube browser which allows to browse, search and play YouTube videos) and PulseAudio for better sound in YouTube. Study all installed packages in RaspEX Build 170810.

Compatibility :: August 2017

Unfortunately not all systems made for Raspberry Pi 2 will run on the new Pi 3. They need to be upgraded with a new kernel. I therefore have to upgrade the systems I distribute. I.e. RaspEX, RaspEX with OpenCPN, RaspAnd Lollipop, RaspAnd Marshmallow, RaspAnd Nougat 7.1.1, RaspAnd 7.1.2 and RaspArch. I have now (170810) upgraded all systems. Read about the new Raspberry Pi 3

Screenshot 1 – RaspEX connected to Windows via Samba

Screenshot 2 – RaspEX connected to Windows via PuTTy

Screenshot 3 – RaspEX “running on” Windows with VNC Viewer

Screenshot 4 – RaspEX running Blueman (Bluetooth Manager)

Kernel
Kernel 4.9.41-exton-v7 is used.

How do I install RaspEX in Windows?
Just like any other Raspberry Pi system. I.e.: Unpack the downloaded ZIP file (raspex-ubuntu-17.04-lxde-1190mb-170810.zip) and transfer the IMAGE file (raspex-ubuntu-17.04-lxde-3050mb-170810.img) to your Micro SD card of at least 8GB. For that you shall use Win32DiskImager in Windows.

SCREENSHOTS

Screenshot 1 – RaspEX connected to Windows via Samba

Screenshot 2 – RaspEX connected to Windows via PuTTy

Screenshot 3 – RaspEX “running on” Windows with VNC-viewer

Screenshot 4 – RaspEX running Midori Private Browser

Screenshot 5 – RaspEX using Pavucontrol (for sound)

Screenshot 6 – RaspEX running SMTube (search and watch YouTube videos)

Screenshot 7 – RaspEX running the Bluetooth Manager

Screenshot 8 – The Desktop 170810

READ MORE…

RaspAnd Nougat 7.1.2 for Raspberry Pi 3 – Build 170805 – with Google Play Store, Aptoide TV, Kodi 17.3 and Google Chrome

NEWS 170805 ABOUT RaspAnd Nougat 7.1.2 with Google Play Store working
I have finally managed to make a version of RaspAnd Nougat 7.1.2 (for Raspberry Pi 3), which has GAPPS installed and Google Play Store working. This version of RaspAnd can be installed in Windows using Win32 Disk Imager. The video performance is generally much better than in previous versions and the screen flickering is (almost) gone.

Download RaspAnd Build 170805…

MORE ABOUT RaspAnd
RaspAnd Nougat 7.1.2 Build 170805 is an Android 7.1.2 Nougat system which can run on Raspberry Pi 3. I have included the following apps:
1) GAPPS (Google Play Services with Google Play Store)
2) Kodi 17.3 (latest version which “allows users to play and view most videos, music, podcasts, and other digital media files from local and network storage media and the Internet”. YouTube is enabled and working very well!)
3) Spotify TV 1.4.0 (working very very well)
4) Google Play Games 5.2.25 (needed for Clash of Clans to run)
5) Clash of Clans is not included, but you can install it through Aptoide TV
6) Gmail 7.4.23
8) Aptoide TV 3.2.3 (for installing new apps which can’t be found on Google Play Store – many many apps can be installed!)
9) ES File Explorer 4.1.6.7.4 working very well
10) Google Chrome 59.0.3071 (latest version – working very well)
11) YouTube 1.3.11 with almost perfect video quality. Please don’t update YouTube to version 2.00.18 even though Google Play Store wants you to do it. If you do you will loose video quality. If you do it by accident just uninstall the update. (I.e. go back to the “Factory version”).

SCREENSHOTS
Screenshot 1 – Nougat boot animation (which you must see during the boot. If not, the installation was unsuccessful)
Screenshot 2 – RaspAnd’s Desktop
Screenshot 3 – Google Play Store running
Screenshot 4 – Kodi running Popcornflix
Screenshot 5 – Google Play Store running
Screenshot 6 – YouTube running
Screenshot 7 – YouTube running with perfect video quality
Screenshot 8 – Aptoide TV running (installing Google Drive)
Screenshot 9Spotify running
Screenshot 10 – Clash of Clans installs in Aptoide TV

READ MORE…

Run your Slackware installation with the latest kernel – 4.13-rc2!

SlackwareNEWS 170725
Kernel 4.13-rc2-x86_64-exton is my newest Slackware kernel. Kernel 4.13-rc2 was released by Kernel.org on July 23, 2017.

I have compiled a very useful (as I think) 64 bit kernel for Slackware Current (14.2) and/or all Slackware derivatives. For example Slax, Zenwalk and SlackEX. The kernel is compiled exactly in the same way as Slackware’s latest kernel huge. “My” kernel 4.13-rc2-x86_64-exton has even more support for new hardware, etc. Kernel 4.13-rc2 is the latest kernel available from Kernel.org. Released 20170723.

What’s new in kernel 4.13?

If you want to install my kernel in your Slackware 64 bit system, do this:

1. Download linux-kernel-4.13-rc2-x86_64-exton.txzmd5sum
2. Install it with the command installpkg linux-kernel-4.13-rc2-x86_64-exton.txz
(The kernel is packed just like Slackware’s original kernels so that everything ends up in the right place)
4. If necessary, change your Grub Legacy/Grub2 configuration
5. If you have an Nvidia graphics card in your computer, you may need to look over your files in /etc/modprobe.d before restarting the computer. That is remove the “blacklisting” of Nouveau’s kernel module in the appropriate files blacklist.conf and nvidia-installer-disable-nouveau.conf. With “my” kernel functions the Nouveau “free” driver works just fine.

NOTE: When you run the command installpkg linux-kernel-4.13-rc2-x86_64-exton.txz vmlinuz will be “created” in /boot. If you have /boot/vmlinuz already that file will be overwritten. In case you want to switch back to your old kernel you should make a backup of /boot/vmlinuz before you run the just mentioned command.

Restart your computer and enjoy!

ExTiX 17.7 with Budgie Desktop, Refracta Tools and kernel 4.11.0.10-exton

About ExTiX 17.7 with the Budgie Desktop
I’ve made a new extra version of ExTiX with Budgie Desktop. Budgie is focused on simplicity and elegance. Designed with the modern user in mind. Only a minimum of packages are installed in ExTiX Budgie. You can of course install all packages you want. Even while running ExTiX Budgie live. I.e. from a DVD or USB stick. Study all installed packages in ExTiX Budgie.

ABOUT ExTiX
All four ExTiX systems are based on Ubuntu and Debian.

Refracta Tools
While running ExTiX Budgie 17.7 live or from hard drive you can use Refracta Tools (pre-installed) to create your own live installable Ubuntu system. A ten year child can do it! Watch a slideshow below.

SCREENSHOTS
ExTiX Budgie Desktop with Spotify running
ExTiX Budgie Desktop – live
ExTiX Budgie Desktop – root
ExTiX Budgie running in VMware

READ MORE…

How To dual boot, triple boot or multiboot Linux with Windows in a simple way and be happy

In this instruction I will show you how easy it is to have several Linux systems installed on one computer together with for example Windows 10. The configuration is so simple a ten year old child can do it.

BACKGROUND
Ubuntu and all Linux systems based on Ubuntu (such as Linux Mint) uses Grub2 as boot manager. Also Debian and most other Linux systems use Grub2. Grub2 works differently from the old Grub Legacy.

UEFI BIOS and non-UEFI BIOS
The Extensible Firmware Interface (EFI) or its version 2.x variant, Unified EFI (UEFI) is a firmware type that is widespread on recent computers, especially those more recent than 2010Ubuntu wiki.

Configuring Grub2 – Example for non-UEFI BIOS computers
One of my computers, an Acer Aspire 5750G from 2010, has a 750 GB hard drive and an external USB hard drive of 1000 GB. On that computer I have Windows 10 and twelve (12) different Linux systems installed. Of those twelve systems three are Android-x86 systems (AndEX Nougat and AndEX Marshmallow).  Below I will describe step by step how I configured Grub2 in the easiest way possible.

1. The computer was delivered with Windows 7 (now updated to Windows 10) preinstalled on /dev/sda2 and /dev/sda3. I immediately started up my computer from a Linux Mint Live DVD. Using GParted, I created seven new partitions on the internal hard drive and three on the external USB hard drive. After that I installed Mint on /dev/sda7 and Grub2 on /dev/sda (MBR) at the same time as the installer also suggested. Then I restarted my computer and checked that Mint (and Windows) could be started. Everything worked (as expected) fine. See screenshots below showing how my partitioning looks like now.

The internal hard drive partitions
Note the 4 GB SWAP partition on /dev/sda6

The external USB drive partitions

2. Then it was time to install Arch Linux on /dev/sda8. When the installation prompted installation of Grub2 during installation, I chose to install Grub2 on /dev/sda8. Such an installation of Grub2 does not affect the existing Grub2 installation in MBR. I did it just the same to find out “start data” for Arch Linux. I then read these start data from Mint in the /mnt/sda8/boot/grub/grub.cfg file.

3. After that I started Mint on /dev/sda7 again. Now it was time to get a real “multiboot computer” using Grub2. This is how I did it:
A) In /etc/grub.d I deleted all files except 00_header, 05_debian_theme, 06_mint_theme, 40_custom and README. Said folder then looked like this.



B)
I edited the /etc/grub.d/40_custom file to look like this. Note that this is how my 40_custom file looks like now when I have installed totally twelve Linux systems. What I should write about the start of Arch Linux (see above) was already fixed by looking at the /mnt/sda8/boot/grub/grub.cfg file. I could do it in a similar way when I installed the other eleven Linux systems.

C) Finally, I ran the update-grub command. Then the /boot/grub/grub.cfg file (which is the file Grub2 “takes into account” at boot) was created/changed. This file (grub.cfg) should never be edited manually. Instead, edit the file 40_custom, as I showed above. Always use Leafpad or Mousepad (or a similar simple editor) when editing 40_custom. Never Libre Office Writer or Word or the like of them. Study my present grub.cfg file. When I now start up my Acer Aspire the boot screen look like this.

My BIOS settings on my Acer Aspire look like this.

Configuring Grub2 – Example for UEFI BIOS computers
On another computer (laptop) Lenovo Z50 from 2015 I have Windows 10 installed together with three Linux systems. Ubuntu 17.04 and two Android-x86 systems. Since Windows 10 was installed in UEFI mode I also had to install Ubuntu 17.04 in UEFI mode to be able to configure Grub2 the way I describe above. I went into BIOS and changed the settings to look like this.

When I went into the boot menu in BIOS I could choose my USB stick. In this case Kingston DataTraveler – watch this screenshot.

So I started up Ubuntu 17.04 from the USB stick and installed it on a partition I had created in advance using GParted.  Since my Lenovo already had a ESP (EFI System Partition) I installed Grub2 onto that partition. When I now start up my Lenovo the boot screen looks like this. (You can of course install many more Linux systems if you like. Just edit /etc/grub.d/40_custom the way I describe above).

IMPORTANT: Identifying if the computer boots the Ubuntu DVD/USB stick in UEFI mode
If the BIOS is set up to boot the DVD/USB stick in UEFI mode, then you will see the screen below.

If the BIOS is NOT set up to boot the CD in UEFI mode, or if the disk is not 64-bit, then you will see the screen below.


(ExTiX is based on Ubuntu)

Grub2 bootsplash
One of the benefits of Grub2 is that you can have a nice high resolution image as bootsplash/grub boot image. The image may have the same size as the resolution on your screen can handle, for example 1366×768. It is common with a regular image in jpg, png or tga format. Just place the image in /boot/grub and run the update-grub command. If you get the answer that the image is found in /boot/grub it will work. If not, try editing the /etc /default/grub file and add the line
GRUB_BACKGROUND = “/boot/grub/MyNicePicture.png”
Then run the update-grub command again (and restart the computer).

Have a look at my /etc/default/grub file.

Change the text – font and size – which Grub2 shows at boot

Run the following command:
grub-mkfont –output=/boot/grub/DejaVuSansMono.pf2 –size=24 /usr/share/fonts/truetype/ttf-dejavu/DejaVuSansMono.ttf
(Maybe you’ll need to run the command (apt-get install ttf-dejavu first). Then edit the /etc/default/grub file and add the following line.
GRUB_FONT=/boot/grub/DejaVuSansMono.pf2
Run the update-grub command again. After rebooting, the Grub2 boot menu will surely look better (depending on how your boot image looks like).

Good luck!

/exton

Read about my Android-x86 Systems – Nougat, Marshmallow, Lollipop and KitKat at
andex.exton.net
– latest is AndEX Nougat!
and
about my Nougat, Marshmallow and Lollipop versions for Raspberry Pi 3/2 at
raspex.exton.se – latest is RaspAnd Nougat!

 

 

Create your own Linux distro based on ExTiX 17.5/Ubuntu 17.04!

In ExTiX 17.5, Build 170508, with KDE 4.16.12 and KDE Frameworks I have included (pre-installed) Refracta Tools, which makes it possible for you to very easy and fast make your own Ubuntu 17.04 (or Ubuntu 17.10) distro.

Important about Refracta
You can use the Refracta Tools (pre-installed in ExTiX 17.5) to create your own installable Ubuntu 17.04 Live DVD once you have installed ExTiX to hard drive. I mean change everything and then create a whole new Ubuntu live system. Start Refracta from Menu >> System >> Create a live CD snapshot of your system. You don’t even have to install ExTiX to hard drive before you can use the Refracta tools. If you have plenty of RAM you can create a new (your own!) Ubuntu system while running ExTiX from DVD or a USB stick. Please note that the whole Refracta process (creating your new ISO) will only take 5 – 10 min! You’ll find the ISO in /home/snapshots. The whole thing is very simple. Watch a sideshow below about how to use Refracta Tools. I.e. create a snapshot of your ExTiX/Ubuntu system.

Good luck!
/exton

Read about my Android-x86 Systems – Nougat, Marshmallow, Lollipop and KitKat at
andex.exton.net
and about my Nougat, Marshmallow and Lollipop versions for Raspberry Pi 3/2 at
raspex.exton.se